Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

March 19, 2013

West Virginia Senate approves barring minors from tanning in salons

By MANNIX PORTERFIELD
for the Daily Telegraph

CHARLESTON — No juvenile need fear a rap on the door at night from the Tanning Police.

If a Senate bill holds up, however, anyone under 18 won’t be able to visit a tanning salon for a deeper shade.

Senators voted 26-8 to approve the bill, which Health and Human Resources Chairman Ron Stollings, D-Boone, said also requires regulation of tanning facilities by the Bureau of Public Health and local health departments.

“Would you be a criminal if you used your own tanning bed?” wondered Sen. Dave Sypolt, R-Preston.

“This is for commercial tanning beds only,” Stollings said. “We’re not going to check people’s houses or anything like that.”

Any facility failing to get a business registration certificate, register with the local board of health, or fails to ask for an inspection would be guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by a $500 fine for a first offense.

A second violation could result in a fine ranging from $1,000 to $2,000, or sent to jail for 10 days to one year, or both.

A third such crime also would be a misdemeanor, exposing the violator to a fine from $2,000 to $5,000, or a jail sentence of 30 days to one year, or both, and have a license revoked.

Voting against SB464, besides Sypolt, were Sens. Clark Barnes, R-Randolph, Craig Blair, R-Berkeley, Mike Green, D-Raleigh, Daniel Hall, D-Wyoming, David Nohe, R-Wood, Chris Walters, R-Putnam, and Bob Williams, D-Taylor.

Other bills cleared on 34-0 tallies.

Government Organization Chairman Herb Snyder, D-Jefferson, explained that SB108 creates a pharmaceutical review team to scrutinize all deaths caused by drug overdoses.

Another measure, SB353, devises the First Informer Broadcasters Act, allowing the West Virginia Broadcasters Association to work in tandem with the Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Services to plan on how information is disseminated in crises.

“There was a great deal of thought in developing this,” Snyder told the Senate.

A third proposal, SB412, changes the way in which conservation district supervisors can be removed from office. Judiciary Chairman Corey Palumbo, D-Kanawha, said they may be bumped out of office in current practice on a notice of haring for neglect of duty or malfeasance in office.