Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

Washington Post Features

August 8, 2012

The biggest airline beef? Hidden fees

What's your biggest airline problem?

That's a question I ask almost every day, and it's coincidentally one that a new Transportation Department panel is trying to answer.

The Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection, created by the latest Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization bill and established in May, is charged with reviewing current aviation consumer protection programs and recommending improvements, if needed. It has held one public meeting so far, with another scheduled for Tuesday, so it still has a long way to go before determining where passengers hurt the most.

Disclosure: I have a horse in this race. I co-founded the Consumer Travel Alliance and serve as its volunteer ombudsman. The group's president, Charlie Leocha, is the consumer representative on the committee. Leocha maintains that the single biggest fixable problem is price transparency, or knowing how much your ticket will cost.

During presentations to the committee, other advocates for air travelers have made compelling cases for different causes, including making it easier to sue airlines and adopting tougher regulations concerning safety and tarmac delays. If I'd made my own pitch, I'd have argued that air travelers are most frustrated by the impression that airlines seem to be able to make up their own rules with little oversight.

So who's right?

To find out, I looked outside the Beltway, asking consumer advocates and service experts to name their top airline problem. If anyone knows where air travelers are hurting, they should.

Edward Hasbrouck, a San Francisco-based consumer advocate and author of "The Practical Nomad: How to Travel Around the World," says that air travelers want to know what they're buying. Airlines could do a far better job of disclosing so-called codeshare agreements and revealing what's included in the price of a ticket as well as the ticket terms. Air carriers aren't currently required to reveal any of those details on your ticket. "I think those are the big issues," he says.

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