Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

Lifestyles

December 21, 2012

Budding boilo baron peddles Pa. holiday cocktail

BLUEFIELD —

RINGTOWN, Pa. (AP) — A peculiar sort of alchemy takes place each Christmas season in Pennsylvania coal country, where skilled practitioners huddle over big pots of steaming liquid, coaxing a potent but soothing elixir from secret recipes handed down through the generations.

This alcoholic yuletide cocktail, called boilo, has been a household staple for more than a century, sipped warm or hot to celebrate the holidays and ward off winter's chill. Boilo parties are in full swing right now as coal-region kitchens fill with the fragrant, intoxicating aroma of spices and citrus.

"It warms you up," said Chris Brokenshire, "and it warms your spirits, too."

The 40-year-old forklift operator from Ringtown knows of what he speaks. He's been making and drinking boilo for nearly 20 years. And now he's hoping to export this obscure cultural oddity to the masses, developing a drink mix that he began selling last month in a few brick-and-mortar stores in Schuylkill County — the epicenter of the boilo-making tradition — as well as online at his website.

Purists may sniff that Brokenshire's powdered boilo mix is a rather generic facsimile of the homemade concoction that's typically made with ingredients like honey, oranges, lemons, caraway and anise seeds, cinnamon sticks, ginger ale and whiskey.

But people are buying it as fast as his manufacturer can produce it and Brokenshire can bag it. Brokenshire sold out of his initial run of 1,000 bags within a few weeks, and he projects he'll sell 30,000 bags by April, when the arrival of warmer weather marks the end of the traditional boilo-making season. He dreams of replicating — on a smaller scale — the success of Yuengling beer, another coal-region staple that has crossed over to the mainstream.

The budding boilo baron figured his target market would be consumers who don't have a good recipe of their own, and those who simply don't have time to make it from scratch. But he had no idea what to expect when those first $8.99 bags hit stores. After all, this is a tradition in which family recipes are treated like fine heirlooms.

Text Only
Lifestyles
BBQ My Way
Viral Video and Slideshows
Facebook