Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

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May 3, 2013

BBQ My Way: Classic BBQ Chicken

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eliminate the major source of flame ups, you are risking a drier piece of chicken at the end.

 

5. Buy a nice poultry rub or better yet, make your own. The rub adds a great flavor and texture.

 

6. Same advice as the previous point pertains to sauce. Buy a BBQ sauce you like, or make your own. I would avoid the brands that promote the “smoky flavor.” That's liquid smoke. Yuck.

 

7. Set up your kettle grill with indirect heat. Sprinkle some hickory chips on the coals if you want a smoky flavor. If using a gas grill, preheat the grill on high then turn off an outside quadrant.

 

8. Scrape down your grates with a wire brush and rub with a rag that has olive oil on it. Reduces sticking.

9. Rub the chicken pieces down with your rub, then place on the grill on the area that DOES NOT have direct heat. Brush with your sauce. Close the grill. What we are doing here is cooking the chicken almost all the way through without exposing the meat to the direct flame. Depending on the heat and the pieces you are cooking, this can take 30 minutes or so. Half way through, turn the chicken and brush the other side with the sauce.

 

The chicken is done when the internal temperature reaches 165 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit, so once you hit 160 degrees, it's time to move the chicken over the direct heat. (Insert an instant read thermometer and take the reading while it is not touching a bone.) Now be ready, as this next step is where you earn your grilling stripes.

 

What's going to happen? Yep. Fire, and potentially lots of it. If you are using a gas grill, turn the heat to low. This won't eliminate the flames but it should make it manageable. If you are using a kettle grill, place the lid on the grill to kill the flames. Remember, once you open it again, those flames will immediately reappear. Smear the chicken with sauce one last time, then discard the remaining sauce

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