Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

Community News Network

October 10, 2013

Ouch! 10 athletes with bizarre injuries that had nothing to do with their sport

Getting hurt on the field is one thing. But pro athletes are just as prone to injuring themselves in unusual ways as the rest of us. Need proof? Here are 10 freakish instances where mind lost out to matter.

Clint Barmes

In 2005 Barmes, then a rookie shortstop with the Colorado Rockies, was sidelined for three months with a broken collarbone after he fell down a flight of stairs while carrying a package of deer meat given to him by teammate Todd Helton. Doctors inserted a titanium plate and nine screws to help the bone heal.

Adam Eaton

In his first full season with the San Diego Padres in 2001, Eaton suffered a bizarre injury when he accidentally stabbed himself in the stomach while trying to open a package of DVDs with a paring knife.

Chris Hanson

In 2003, Jaguars coach Jack Del Rio placed some wood and an ax in the team's locker room to inspire his players to "keep chopping wood" after an 0-3 start to the season. Hanson, taking Del Rio's message far too literally, gashed his right leg with the ax while trying to chop the wood, thus ending his season.

Gus Frerotte

In 1997, after scoring on a one-yard run late in the first half of a game against the New York Giants, the Redskins quarterback celebrated by head-butting a padded wall near the end zone. Frerotte suffered a sprained neck and was taken to a nearby hospital. Remarkably, he was able to play the following week.

Jeff Kent

An incident during spring training in 2002 left the Giants' star second baseman with a broken wrist. Kent initially claimed that he sustained the injury while washing his truck; however, subsequent media reports indicated that Kent hurt himself when he crashed his motorcycle while doing stunts on it -- in direct violation of his contract.

Brian Anderson

In 1998, while pitching for the Arizona Diamondbacks, Anderson decided to test the temperature of an iron…by pressing it against his jaw. Yes, it was hot.

Bill Gramatica

While kicking for the Arizona Cardinals in 2001, Gramatica tore the ACL in his right leg while celebrating a 43-yard field goal. In the first quarter. Of a regular season game. He missed the rest of the season.

Lionel Simmons

During his rookie season with the Sacramento Kings in 1990-91, Simmons missed two games with tendinitis in his wrist, brought on by too much time spent playing his Nintendo Game Boy.

Tom Glavine

After a particularly disagreeable meal on a team flight in 1992, Glavine threw up so violently that he cracked two ribs and landed on the disabled list.

John Vanbiesbrouck

Following the 1988 season, Vanbiesbrouck -- an All-Star goaltender with the New York Rangers -- lacerated his ulnar nerve and three tendons when the glass table he was sitting on collapsed. He needed five hours of surgery to remove glass shards from his wrist and repair the damage. He recovered in time for the team's training camp three months later.

Sources: Wikipedia and media reports

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