Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

Breaking News

Z_CNHI News Service

October 29, 2013

Is the NCAA a sinking ship?

(Continued)

Who thinks Alabama’s Nick Saban or Kentucky’s John Calipari would endorse a deal like that?

The pros, other than baseball, aren’t going to invest in an expanded minor league system. Therefore, the colleges must be hoping that the professional leagues and their player associations further limit when an athlete can trade in his student-athlete status for a pro contract. So far there’s been no inclination that will happen, and if it ever should, you can bet with total assurance an athlete would challenge that move in court in a nanosecond.

At the same time, university power brokers are drawing a hard line on compensating players. Those top athletes, who see college as a place to hone their skills, can forget about getting paid. When it comes to money, there’s little love for the ones scoring the touchdowns or grabbing the rebounds.

Once again it was the Big Ten’s Delany, whose conference counts $310 million a year in revenue, according to Forbes, leading the charge. “If they’re not comfortable and want to monetize, let the minor leagues flourish,” he said.

He wasn’t the only one squashing that pay-for-play notion. According to an article in ESPN written by Howard Bryant, Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim said paying athletes was “the most idiotic suggestion of all time.” Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski, also an opponent of paying players, said it was time for colleges to “redefine amateurism.”

Perhaps it’s time that colleges also took a look at their mission statement and “redefine” the role college athletics should play in higher education and campus life in general.

The NCAA and college presidents are dancing close to the line where they appear to be painting athletes as the villains in this whole sordid mess.

Maybe the NCAA can find a way around the worrisome lawsuits it’s facing and maybe Emmert and his staff can make the NCAA a more workable and responsive organization. But maybe not.

Text Only
Z_CNHI News Service
  • The virtues of lying

    Two computational scientists set out recently to simulate the effects of lying in a virtual human population. Their results, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, show that lying is essential for the growth of a cohesive social network.

    July 31, 2014

  • Sunburn isn't the only sign of summer that can leave you itchy and blistered

    You've got a rash. You quickly rule out the usual suspects: You haven't been gardening or hiking or even picnicking, so it's probably not a plant irritant such as poison ivy or wild parsnip; likewise, it's probably not chiggers or ticks carrying Lyme disease; and you haven't been swimming in a pond, which can harbor the parasite that causes swimmer's itch.

    July 30, 2014

  • Survey results in legislation to battle sexual assault on campus

    Missouri U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill joined a bipartisan group of senators Wednesday to announce legislation that aims to reduce the number of sexual assaults on college campuses.

    July 30, 2014

  • An alarming threat to airlines that no one's talking about

    It's been an abysmal year for the flying public. Planes have crashed in bad weather, disappeared over the Indian Ocean and tragically crossed paths with anti-aircraft missiles over Ukraine.

    July 30, 2014

  • Fast food comes to standstill in China

    The shortage of meat is the result of China's latest food scandal, in which a Shanghai supplier allegedly tackled the problem of expired meat by putting it in new packaging and shipping it to fast-food restaurants around the country

    July 28, 2014

  • Screen Shot 2014-07-28 at 1.33.11 PM.png VIDEO: High-dive accident caught on tape

    A woman at a water park in Idaho leaped off a 22-foot high dive platform, then tried to pull herself back up with frightening results. Fortunately, she escaped with only a cut to her finger.

    July 28, 2014 1 Photo

  • Brother sues W.Va. senator over business loan

    U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin's brother claims he's owed $1.7 million that he loaned to keep a family carpet out of bankruptcy in the 1980s.

    July 25, 2014

  • 072214 Diamond Llama 1.jpg Llama on the loose corralled in Missouri town

    A llama on the lam cruised Main Street Tuesday before it mistook a resident’s fenced backyard for a place to grab a meal and freshen up.

    July 22, 2014 2 Photos

  • VIDEO: New story emerges about Texas children locked in hot car

    After footage showed Texas shoppers breaking the windows of a hot car to rescue children trapped inside, additional witnesses have come forward to correct the story behind what has become a viral video.

    July 16, 2014

  • Screen Shot 2014-07-16 at 2.12.33 PM.png Gunshots narrowly miss TV reporter

    A reporter for a West Virginia television station narrowly escaped injury or worse Monday while covering a fatal weekend shooting in Beckley.

    July 16, 2014 1 Photo