Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

Breaking News

Sister Newspapers' Blogs

February 6, 2013

Rock Doc: Famous villain is back in the news

My father taught me the line when I was a child: “A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse!”

Those were the words William Shakespeare put into the mouth of King Richard III when he was knocked off his horse in the midst of the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485. Richard was killed, ending the rule of the Plantagenet royalty in England and ushering in the time of the Tudors.

Shakespeare famously depicted Richard III as a hunchbacked villain who murdered members of his own family to cement his claim to the throne. Later historians have not all painted such a grim picture of Richard as Shakespeare did, but it’s fair to say that no one has made him out to be a quiet pacifist.

Richard made news in his day and now is again stirring up interest in the media. That’s because his bones have been discovered under a parking lot in the English city of Leicester.

Part of the evidence that the bones really are Richard’s depends on what’s called mitochondrial DNA. That’s the form of DNA that’s passed down through maternal lines, not mixed 50-50 with paternal DNA. Lazy souls like me sometimes call mitochondrial DNA “mama DNA” because mitochondrial is quite a mouthful.

There are two known living descendants of Richard III. One is a furniture maker named Michael Ibsen. He is a descendant of Richard’s sister, Anne of York, and thus he carries the “mama DNA” in question. Results of DNA analysis just completed show a high degree of match in the “mama-DNA” of the bones and that of Ibsen.

Ibsen evidently has quite a bit to adjust to these days.

“I never thought I’d be a match,” he said as reported by CNN.

There is other evidence that the bones are really those of Richard III. The remains show wounds consistent with the battle blows thought to have ended Richard’s life. And the remains were found at what once had been Greyfriars friary. The exact location of the grave had been lost to history, but it makes sense the body would have been buried on ground belonging at the time to the Church.

Text Only
Sister Newspapers' Blogs
Bill Archer
AP Video
New Pictures of Ship That Sank in 1888 Raw: Kangaroo Rescued From Swimming Pool Admirers Flock to Dole During Kansas Homecoming Raw: Obama Plays Soccer With Japanese Robot SKorea Ferry Toll Hits 156, Search Gets Tougher Raw: Cattle Truck Overturns in Texas Oregon Gay Marriage Ban Goes to Court Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US Raw: Erupting Volcanoes in Guatemala and Peru Video Shows Possible Syrian Gas Attack Cubs Superfans Celebrate Wrigley's 100th Raw: 3 American Doctors Killed in Afghanistan Raw: What's Inside a Commercial Jet Wheel Well Raw: Obama Arrives at State Dinner in Tokyo Raw: Obama Visits Meiji Shrine in Tokyo U.S. Paratroopers in Poland, Amid Ukraine Crisis FBI Joining Probe of Suburban NY 'Swatting' Call Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs Alibaba IPO Could Be Largest Ever for Tech Firm Swimmer Michael Phelps Attempts Comeback
Greg Jordan