Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

Sister Newspapers' News

November 7, 2012

Lost wallet, found memories

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — Glenn Floering’s father died about 20 years ago and he has drawn on fond memories and an occasional story to keep that loving spirit alive.

But it wasn’t until recently, when Floering and his wife, Michelle, got a surprising phone call, that a new story about his father's life came to mind.

“I said, ‘Hello’ and (the caller) said, ‘I have information that will rock your world,’” said Michelle, director of bands at Grand Traverse Academy. “Honestly, I thought it was a scam. He

said, ‘My stepson was doing construction on Fremont Street in Las Vegas. He was digging into 10 inches of concrete and he found a wallet that belonged to Glenn’s father.’ Then he read his name: Kenny Stott Floering.”

The wallet had disintegrated, but its contents were still intact, protected by plastic, Michelle said. Inside were Kenny’s airman, meal and social security cards, and a picture of a Filipino woman in front of a house.

That caller was Terry Snyder, a North Las Vegas history buff and amateur artifact hunter.

After going back to the construction site to retrieve the wallet, Snyder did an Internet search and learned that Kenny Floering died in 1992, followed by his wife, Manuela, in 1999.

That left Floering and his sister, Lisa Haarbye, who lives in Norway. So Snyder tracked down Floering, technology director at Bay Pointe Community Church and a professional musician who shared his father’s love of jazz.

Snyder mailed the wallet to the Floerings and researched the site where it was found. Floering believes the wallet went missing in 1961, when his dad, who grew up in Laporte, Ind., returned to the U.S. via Las Vegas to obtain an honorable discharge and permission to bring his new wife to the States.

At the time, the construction site was a women’s clothing store owned by Mayer Jacob “Chic” Hecht, Snyder said. Hecht, who

later became a Republican senator from Nevada, served as an intelligence agent with the U.S. armed forces during the Korean

War, from 1951 to 1953, and was a member of the National

Military Intelligence Association.

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