Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

National and World

July 2, 2013

Stroke survivors may recover language function through brain stimulation

Non-invasive therapy delivered significant results

(Continued)

"TMS had the biggest impact on improvement in anomia, the inability to name objects, which is one of the most debilitating aphasia symptoms," Thiel said.

Researchers, in essence, shut down the working part of the brain so that the stroke-affected side could relearn language. "This is similar to physical rehabilitation where the unaffected limb is immobilized with a splint so that the patients must use the affected limb during the therapy session," Thiel said.

"We believe brain stimulation should be most effective early, within about five weeks after stroke, because genes controlling the recovery process are active during this time window," he said.

Story provided by ConsumerAffairs.

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