Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

National and World

January 18, 2013

Winfrey mixes technical, personal in interview

NEW YORK (AP) — The most effective part of Oprah Winfrey's interview with Lance Armstrong came right at the beginning: Five questions, five one-word answers — each of them the same.

"Yes or no," Winfrey said. "Did you ever take banned substances to enhance your cycling performance?

"Was one of those banned substances EPO?

"Did you ever blood dope or use blood transfusions to enhance your cycling performance?

"Did you ever use any other banned substances like testosterone, cortisone or human growth hormones?

"In all seven of your Tour de France victories, did you ever take banned substances or blood dope?"

Yes, yes, yes, yes and yes. In what Winfrey has called the most important interview of her television career, she couldn't be accused of burying the lead. It set up everything that followed in the first, 90-minute segment of Armstrong's confessional (Part two is set to air Friday).

The passage also established that the disgraced cycling champion had spent much of his life as an aggressive liar and weakened a lot of what was to follow as a viewing experience. Armstrong even admitted it at points. He knew people tuning in would have a hard time believing much of what he said.

There were no tears, no pleading for sympathy. Armstrong was a beaten man, and he knew it.

For Winfrey, it was a particularly challenging interview. She needed to get in the weeds of technical material involving drugs, investigations and a huge cast of characters and accusations. Yet it was important not to get lost in those weeds, to keep sight of the human element, and for the most part she handled it ably.

Winfrey discussed the accusations that Armstrong had essentially led the doping program involving his cycling team, putting pressure on teammates to join him and race dirty. Armstrong said he never explicitly told teammates they had to dope — despite testimony to the contrary that Winfrey reported — but acknowledged that his own position as the team leader amounted to implicit pressure.

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