Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

National and World

January 9, 2013

Police: Colo. shooting suspect planned massacre

CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) — Witnesses presenting the most detailed portrait yet of last year's Aurora movie theater massacre are detailing sometimes paradoxical behavior by James Holmes, the man accused of the rampage.

At a hearing to determine whether Holmes should stand trial, detectives testified Tuesday that Holmes spent more than two months assembling an arsenal for the assault on a midnight screening of "The Dark Knight Returns."

The former neuroscience graduate student bought his tickets nearly two weeks before the July 20 massacre. He also rigged an elaborate — and potentially deadly — booby-trap system in his apartment to distract police from the carnage at the theater, though the trap was never sprung, they testified.

Holmes showed less focus after police arrested him as he stood outside the theater, clad in body armor. He played with the paper bags they placed on his hands to preserve gunpowder evidence, pretending they were puppets, Aurora Det. Craig Appel testified. Holmes tried to jam a staple into an electrical outlet.

Holmes' lawyers were expected to present an insanity defense. They have previously stated that Holmes, 25, is mentally ill. Defense lawyer Tamara Brady pointedly asked a federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives agent in court Tuesday whether any Colorado law prevented "a severely mentally ill person" from buying the 6,295 rounds of ammunition, body armor and handcuffs that Holmes purchased online.

There is not, the agent replied.

Defense attorneys have indicated they might present witnesses during this week's hearing to describe Holmes' mental health.

On Tuesday, the case was dominated by the litany of Holmes' preparations. Law enforcement officers said Holmes' first recorded purchase was of two tear gas grenades, ordered online May 10.

Holmes also bought two Glock handguns, a shotgun and an AR-15 rifle, along with 6,295 rounds of ammunition, targets, body armor and chemicals, prosecutors said. The magnitude of the attack was captured in the first 911 call, played Tuesday in court, that police said recorded at least 30 shots in 27 seconds.

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