Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

National and World

September 12, 2013

Russian prestige on the line in Syria

WASHINGTON — The White House tried Wednesday to pin the success or failure of a diplomatic option to secure Syria’s chemical weapons on Russia rather than the United States as Secretary of State John Kerry headed for Geneva to work on a Russian proposal for international inspectors to seize and destroy the deadly stockpile.

On a different diplomatic front aimed at taking control of the stockpile away from the Assad government, the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council met Wednesday at Russia’s U.N. mission to consider goals for a new resolution requiring Syria’s chemical weapons to be dismantled. They left without commenting, but whether a U.N. resolution should be militarily enforceable was already emerging as a point of contention.

Rebels who had hoped U.S.-led strikes against the Syrian government would aid their effort expressed disappointment, if not condemnation of the U.S., over President Barack Obama’s decision to pursue diplomacy in the wake of a chemical weapons attack in the Damascus suburbs last month that the U.S. says killed more than 1,400 people.

“We’re on our own,” Mohammad Joud, an opposition fighter in the war-shattered northern city of Aleppo, said via Skype. “I always knew that, but thanks to Obama’s shameful conduct, others are waking up to this reality as well.”

With the American public focus on diplomacy rather than military might, Vice President Joe Biden and senior White House officials summoned House Democrats and Republicans for classified briefings. The sessions followed up Obama’s nationally televised address Tuesday night in which he kept the threat of U.S. airstrikes on the table and said it was too early to say whether the Russian offer would succeed.

White House spokesman Jay Carney declined to put a deadline on diplomatic efforts to resolve the standoff but said that bringing Syria’s chemical weapons stockpile under international control “obviously will take some time.”

“Russia is now putting its prestige on the line,” he said. Asked whether U.S. prestige also was on the line, Carney said: “The United States leads in these situations. And it’s not always popular and it’s not always comfortable.”

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