Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

National and World

December 26, 2012

Music project aims to keep Civil War stories fresh

ATLANTA (AP) — Blood once soaked the ground of battlefields now covered by skyscrapers and train stations in Atlanta, strip malls in Nashville and farm fields and forests across the South.

Now, 150 years after the American Civil War, two musicians are trying to keep that history from fading.

The women, who write about Civil War clashes and those who fought them, are recording videos on battlefields that inspired their songs. They've also developed a presentation for schools.

Vanessa Olivarez and Elizabeth Elkins say the project aims to make sure the war stories are kept alive, and battlefields are preserved and protected from development.

Their band, Granville Automatic, divides its time between Atlanta and Nashville and has worked with the nonprofit Civil War Trust, the National Park Service and others on the project.

1
Text Only
National and World
Local News
AP Video
Police Arrest Suspect in Highway Shootings Drought Concerns May Hurt Lake Tourism Vermont Goat Meat Gives Refugees Taste of Home Calif. Investigators Re-construct Fatal Bus Cras Appellate Court Hears Okla. Gay Marriage Case Horseless Carriage Introduced at NY Auto Show Chelsea Clinton Is Pregnant Beau Biden Plans 2016 Run for Del. Governor Flamingo Frenzy Ahead of Zoo Construction Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups Obama Hopeful on Ukraine, Will Watch Russians U.S. Sending Nonlethal Aid to Ukraine Military Holder: Americans Stand With KC Mourners Diplomats Reach Deal to Ease Tensions in Ukraine Obama Greets Wounded Warriors Boston Bombing Survivors One Year Later Sister of Slain MIT Officer Reflects on Bombing Raw: Blast at Tennessee Ammunition Plant Kills 1 Raw: Urinator Causes Portland to Flush Reservoir Hoax Bomb Raises Anxiety in Boston
Sister Newspapers' News