Bluefield Daily Telegraph, Bluefield, WV

National and World

December 26, 2012

Music project aims to keep Civil War stories fresh

ATLANTA (AP) — Blood once soaked the ground of battlefields now covered by skyscrapers and train stations in Atlanta, strip malls in Nashville and farm fields and forests across the South.

Now, 150 years after the American Civil War, two musicians are trying to keep that history from fading.

The women, who write about Civil War clashes and those who fought them, are recording videos on battlefields that inspired their songs. They've also developed a presentation for schools.

Vanessa Olivarez and Elizabeth Elkins say the project aims to make sure the war stories are kept alive, and battlefields are preserved and protected from development.

Their band, Granville Automatic, divides its time between Atlanta and Nashville and has worked with the nonprofit Civil War Trust, the National Park Service and others on the project.

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